The Biggest Myth Regarding Low Milk Supply

Breastfeeding baby“What can I do to up my milk supply?”

The most common question I hear. Worrying about whether baby is getting enough milk is a natural and normal concern. Especially since , most of the time you’re not actually getting to SEE the milk with your eyes.  Thing is, it’s not black and white. I wish I could give you some top secret recipe that would be the cure all for every single breastfeeding mom out there worried about her supply , but I can’t. First thing I ask is , “Why do you think you have an issue with your supply?” Most of the time I get the reply of , “Well because I’m only able to pump an ounce or two at a time.” Now here is the magical answer that should calm your nerves a bit.

Only being able to pump an ounce or two is actually pretty normal. While it can be frustrating, you don’t actually NEED three refrigerators full of milk. Also, something very important to understand is the amount of milk you pumped out is not a true indicator of your supply. So while you were only able to get two ounces out with a pump, there could very easily be two ounces or more left in your breasts . Try placing baby on the breast after each pumping session.. Your body produces more milk when your breasts empty. The more they empty , the more they will make. A baby can get the milk out far more efficiently than a pump ever could.

Now if you suspect there is a real issue with your supply go through the checklist. Is there plenty of wet diapers? gaining weight? Does baby seem content after nursing? If you can answer yes to all of those then everything seems to be on track, BUT and this is a big but, I recommend you get an assessment from an experienced IBCLC. I recommend ALL newly breastfeeding moms have a visit or two with one , even if everything seems to be going fine. Only because they may spot something you didn’t , be able to help and provide comfort you may not have known you even needed , and more importantly they can assess your situation & will most likely, be able to conclusively tell you if your baby isn’t getting enough milk. The great thing about IBCLC’s is the fact breastfeeding is all they do. That is their specialty, and a GOOD IBCLC will be able to assess on an individual basis to come up with a specific game plan. Most IBCLC’s also keep up with new information that comes out about breastfeeding every single day. Whereas a doctor may not even have any formal education in breastfeeding and will make it black and white. I’ve known a lot of doctors who immediately rush to, “Just top up with a bottle after every feed if you’re worried” without even assessing the mom on an individual basis!

Our society does not take breastfeeding as serious as they should or as serious as the mom who chose to breastfeed does. So even though topping up after a feed could be detrimental to your breastfeeding relationship , to them, it doesn’t matter one way or another. To them , it’s ‘Well good thing there is always formula you can turn to.” When a mom makes the choice to breastfeed healthcare professionals, friends, and family , should do whatever it takes to help the mom meet her breastfeeding goals, even if they don’t believe it’s worth the “hassle” because clearly the ones breastfeeding thinks that it is. Instead of , making it sound like , “Well who cares if your supply tanked , baby is being fed at least.” When had they given a correct assessment , it very well could have been avoided!

Of course , all that matters at the end of the day is a happy, content, baby with a full belly, but that doesn’t mean a mom should be coerced into her backup plan earlier than she wanted. Example- Most moms plan and prefer to have a vaginal delivery , but by necessity ended up having to have a C-section instead. At the end of the day , is it great that the baby still came out happy and healthy, despite not giving birth had she wanted? Sure , but it wasn’t something she wanted or planned on doing . She would have preferred giving birth vaginally. Do we need to start a hashtag #BirthIsBest, to ensure those moms realize that? No. Because they do realize it and they are grateful that another means of delivery was possible because the end goal is the same for both scenarios, a happy , healthy baby came out of it , but it doesn’t mean she can’t be disappointed and it doesn’t make her wrong for wanting to hold out for a vaginal birth , until she was absolutely certain it was the right choice. She doesn’t need to hear during that , “It’s just a C-section , C-sections are a good thing, they save so many babies every year.” DUH… Captain obvious , that is why she ended up okaying because no matter what it takes and how it’s done if it leads to a happy thriving baby , then so be it.

The invention of formula is great , but that doesn’t mean breastfeeding should be pushed aside & dismissed so easily , just because an alternative feeding option exist. Now if a mom , expressed feelings that she really doesn’t want to continue on with breastfeeding for whatever reason and there are lots of reasons why a mom would choose so of her own free will , then of course, support her through it. At that point it would be appropriate to say things like, “Well it’s a good thing you can turn to an alternative feeding method. All that matters is that your baby is fed.” Say that stuff AFTER, she herself, expresses her desire to no longer breastfeed. Let her come to that decision on her own , don’t push it along. Formula can be a Godsend for many and as a breastfeeding advocate , I’m happy it exists , but we need to stop pushing it on moms and making them needlessly doubt their own body’s ability to nourish her child. Unless there is evidence that baby isn’t getting enough milk & unless a breastfeeding mom sates her desire to formula feed, respect her breasts.

A real life superhero in peppa pig pajamas…

By: Mom Dot Com by emma lou harrisemmaharris

Last night Joe told me the best thing I ever did for MYSELF was learning to give No Fucks about what people think of my parenting.
Truth is I didn’t learn, it was gifted to me.

Last year I was so overwelmbed with fucks I didn’t know what to do with the twats.
Last year, every single word someone said about me or my children, my fucks would snatch those words and suck them into my soul.
Sometimes even when people said nothing at all.
I had suffered with Post Natal Depression ever since my second child Jax was 12 weeks old. I say suffered and I mean it.

I’ll keep this simple. There’s no need for a Gandhi like analysis of wisdom here. Its as simple as this.

I was suicidal.

Im not going to say I wanted to die .
Nobody wants to die but I thought I had to.
I simply didn’t know how to live anymore and I didn’t want to.
Not because I didn’t love my children, but because I loved them TOO much, if that’s even possible.
I loved my children so much, that I didn’t know where to house this love. I didn’t know how to handle the emotions that these wonderful creations arrived with.
I loved my children so much, that I tortured myself night and day about how I couldn’t possibly be enough for them.
I taunted myself, I bullied myself about every single thing I did or didn’t do for them.
I invited guilt to come and live with me. Every moment of the day I let it lodge for free inside me. I thought I deserved guilt.

To me, these children deserved more then the world. How could I ever give them that?
They needed more then me and I thought everyone knew it.
I thought everyone knew I wasn’t enough.
Some small good intended remark from one person on any day was enough to prompt me to bully myself for the rest of it. Sometimes week. Or until the next comment.
My mind and my heart were both now holding on to feelings that served me no purpose. Piling up around me and just sitting there like old newspapers in an ‘extreame hoarders’ house.
Stacking higher and higher until I couldn’t be seen anymore and everything became too clostrophobic for me. Everything closed in on top of me pushing me down and down until there I was, in rock bottoms basement, trapped and alone.
Not a very nice place to be.

To a person stuck down there you start to think you’re alone. Nobody else is where you are.
You’ve all the time in the world to think, and then overthink. You belong there for being a bad mother.
Incarcarated in your own mind and there is only one way out.

One night I lay down beside Frankie. This gorgeous little presence here on earth . This little person that doesn’t know of guilt, or judgment,just honesty. I had had a bad day and therefore I presumed that they did too. I was cross and snappy and teary and probably wasn’t going to be winning any mother of the year awards.

Frankie was just dozing off when suddenly she scootched herself over to me. She covered us both over with her little princess duvet, put her tiny little arm around my neck and she said ” Mammy, Are you ok? ”
Taken aback I said ” Yes, of course I’m ok why wouldn’t I be?

Said said “Ok”

15 seconds later, her arm still around me she sqeezed hard and said,

” Mammy, you’re the best mammy in the world and I dont want anyone else as my mammy, only you”

And just like that, this tiny little person saved me.
A real life superhero in peppa pig pajamas.

I realised that very second that it does’nt matter what anyone thinks of you as a mother except the little humans who call you ‘mom’. They are the only people on this earth who have the right to say if you are worthy of the title or not and yet to them, THEY will never feel worthy enough to have YOU as their mother.

If you can, try to see yourself as the mother you are through their eyes. Not through yours.

I gave up all my fucks that night and I can honestly say I dont know where those turds reside these days, but its not in me.

Thank you for saving me Miss Frankie Beau. X

Visit – Mom Dot Com by emma lou harris & give her a follow!

I Didn’t Want To Breastfeed, I Needed To…

By: Mariah Johal

To the woman about to read this –

your feeding journey is unique to you. You had a choice to make or maybe a choice was made for you medically. I, as a mother, a woman and a friend support your choice. This is not a one sided story adding to a never ending debate between which is the lesser evil. This is in no way shared to make any woman feel bad for her own feeding journey. This is the only journey I know – this is my feeding journey.

I never wanted to breastfeed. It was something I was against. Time and time again I compared it to dairy farm animal behavior. I didn’t care how others chose to feed their children but for me it was a absolute no. I couldn’t even be in a room with a breastfeeding mom… the whole thing creeped me out and made me uncomfortable. Coming from a family of formula feeders it really is no surprise where my negative feelings started. Myself and my 2 cousins are among the first generation of exclusive breast feeders in our family.

If I’m being honest, we still really don’t have the support we need. I don’t really think those who chose not to breastfeed understand how hard, exhausting and lonely the journey can be for an exclusively breastfeeding mother. In the second and third trimesters of my pregnancy I started buying formula and bottles. Stocking up on every brand and option available. I signed up for samples and coupons and collected all that I could for my formula feeding journey. I can’t express how strongly I felt that I would never breastfeed a baby in my life… yes… by choice!! I received a lot of negativity on my opinion from breastfeeding friends and a lot of support from my formula feeding family. I didn’t know much about being a mom but I knew that this was a area of motherhood I had all figured out.

The day Imari was born was magical and the second she was out they asked me if I wanted to latch her. NO! I had been through this a thousand times. NO! NO! NO! Within 30 or so minutes of her being born the midwife suggested it was time for her to eat. “Are you sure you don’t want to latch her?” …. AGAIN… NO! My husband opened a bottle of infant Similac and was the first person to feed our daughter. There was no looking back…. or so I thought. Bottle feeding a newborn is stressful. Measuring bottles, sanitizing, preparing…. its insanely stressful and you really are never sure if they are over eating or not eating enough. After 2 days on formula Imari was not doing well. She was born extremely jaundice to the point that her eyes were yellow like the walls of someone who chain smokes in their apartment. The midwives were worried. After a blood test confirmed that she had very high levels of bilirubin the midwife suggested and pleaded with me to try latching her. She told me it was a good alternative to a night in the hospital and something in human milk was really going to help. I chose a home birth to avoid the hospital. I wasn’t about to admit myself and my daughter now. At that point I was still extremely uncomfortable but my mothers instinct took over. I would try anything to help her. I tried to latch her…. I tried and tried and I just couldn’t do it. So my midwife suggested getting a pump. And so the journey I was determined never to embark on began…

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I pumped and pumped and pumped. Every 2 hours for 20 minutes. I pumped 3-4 times in the middle of the night. I pumped while my husband fed our daughter. I missed out on so much. The opportunity to hold her and feed her and nourish her with breastmilk or formula because of my own reservations and adamance not to breastfeed. When I wasn’t pumping I was washing bottles and organizing the pieces. She was formula and breastmilk fed from day 4-7 and then a plethora of other issues presented themselves. Inconsolable crying, not eating, not getting comfortable, uncontrollable vomiting. Imari was born with severe acid reflux. On top to this she had food sensitivities to almost everything. We realized quickly that she was allergic to dairy and quickly switched to supplementing with soy based and she broke out in hives. At this point the stress levels were high and we had a very unhappy baby. I decided that we would exclusively give her breastmilk and we stopped all formula at 7 days old. Again…. pump pump pump, sanitize bottles…. over and over and over… day and night. Still, never feeding her because I was busy… you guessed it! Pumping!

One day between the baby blues, the pumping and the realization that in a few weeks my husband was going back to work and I would be doing this all alone I decided enough was enough. Let’s try latching baby again. We called in a private lactation consultant into our home to sit with me to privately and properly show me how it’s done.  Imari had latched herself within 20 minutes thanks to the lactation consultants help. I had spent hours and hours and hours trying alone and all I needed was someone, a woman, to empower me and give me the confidence that I could do this. I was lucky. Imari wanted to breastfeed. She was a baby who never gave up on her mom. She kept trying to feed even when I was holding her with tears running down my face and milk running down my chest. I cried, I cried day and night. I cried because I was frustrated, I cried because I needed support. I cried because I felt ashamed to breastfeed my baby. I cried because inside I was fighting an emotional war with myself. The one side that was disgusted with myself and the other side that was just trying to be a good mom.

Imari was resilient to her stomach issues and looked at me with understanding eyes every time I had a emotional breakdown. She truly went through every bump in the road with me. The troubles didn’t end there. With Imari’s acid reflux breastfeeding was still a struggle. I would feed her and she would be calm and comforted one moment and the next moment she would push off my chest hitting me, hands in the air, screaming bloody murder and projectile vomiting. This went on for 2 weeks and with the reflux getting more and more difficult for the 3 of us we decided to have her put on Ranitidine. That wasn’t a first choice and as a couple who doesn’t believe in pharmaceuticals, a very hard one.

From the day she was put on antacid she was a brand new baby. I had also dramatically changed my diet – I was a proud vegetarian but her allergies and gassy food sensitivities included soy, dairy, nuts, beans, lentils and cocoa. I decided against my personal beliefs to start eating meat again… to nourish her with protein the only way I knew how. She was finally, no longer in pain and could feed how a baby is supposed to. That day, at 2 weeks old we boxed up all of our bottles and formula and put them away. We haven’t used either since. Breastfeeding, once my anxiety was gone became easy to us. Imari wanted to feed and I wanted to feed her. The journey was long, the journey was hard, but the journey was worth it.

It really doesn’t matter if you choose to breastfeed or formula feed your baby… either way it’s going to be a struggle. I am a mom who started my path on formula and took a fork in the road for a journey into breastfeeding. I can honestly say both were exhausting. I have tested myself emotionally and mentally for the past 4 months. I was ashamed to tell my mom and grandmother that I had to start breastfeeding. Can you believe that? Literally ashamed in fear of what they will think. Are they going to call me disgusting behind my back? Something so natural had me emotionally hating myself. I still can’t feed in public. It gives me anxiety and I feel very awkward. Thankfully my daughter is amazing and understanding. She is right there with me every step of the way. I’ve become a pro at car feedings and recently fed her in a restaurant with a cover up. I’m extremely proud of that. The feeding only lasted 4 minutes because she couldn’t concentrate, but it’s these baby steps that are important for my growth as a new mom.

My husband and I often reflect back to that person I used to be, before Imari, before being a mom. We are still so shocked at how far I’ve come. Freezing breastmilk is a hobby for me now, literally. I challenge myself to how much I can get in one sitting. I’m very fortunate to have an abundance of milk and can easily pump 10 oz in under 15 minutes. That’s something, this new me, is also extremely proud of. I decided to post this picture in support of a ongoing breastfeeding movement because what I’m doing is not disgusting, it isn’t shameful. It’s beautiful. It’s how my daughter is growing and getting her nourishment. I don’t think that’s something to be ashamed of. What I ask for is love and support from the women in my life. Regardless of your personal views, regardless of how you were raised or your beliefs, please be kind. It takes a special kind of woman to make the sacrifices I’ve made emotionally and mentally. My journey has been long, my journey has been hard. I have cried more tears than I ever dreamed imaginable. I have given my feeding journey a good fight. Please do not fight against me. Please fight with me.

Picsart/BFMT Tree of Life Photo Contest

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The Tree of Life Breastfeeding photos have broke the internet. So many moms who were too nervous to share their breastfeeding photo in the past have found confidence doing so with the #treeoflife edit from Picsart. When I saw the thousands of comments on the first tree of life photo I posted, followed by articles from The Huffington Post and today.com,  I knew that something special was happening. I had the idea to do a contest as a way of getting moms excited to share their tree of life edits! Picsart caught wind of my idea and they wanted to collaborate with us! We will be hosting the #treeoflife contest on Instagram starting tomorrow , Friday December 23rd!

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“My beautiful rainbow baby after 5 miscarriages & 7 years of infertility struggles! 16 months strong & still going even with the struggles of lip/tongue tie in the beginning! ❤” ~Latasha

 

Win a 16 X 16 Canvas Print of your very own Tree of Life photo in the Picsart/BFMT #TreeofLife photo Contest on Instagram!

How To enter-

*Follow @picsart & @bfmamatalk on Instagram

*Find us on Facebook too – Picsart & Breastfeeding Mama Talk

*Upload your photo and tag @picsart & @bfmamatalk

*Include these hash tags – #MadeWithPicsArt #BrelfieContest

*Please share this blog and tag friends!

Contest will run for about five days and the winner will be randomly chosen & will be announced on January 4th 2017!

Domestic Shipping only! So sorry to our international mamas ! You can certainly participate though!

Need help figuring out how to do the tree of life edit on your photo?

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Video tutorial below-

 

CARE Code Alliance Fighting Booby Traps…

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The C.A.R.E. Code Alliance of the Best for Babes Foundation is the first-ever alliance of companies, nonprofit organizations and media outlets putting positive pressure on the Booby Traps® to help make the 360-degree world around expecting and new moms safe, supportive and positive.  In hospitals and health providers’ offices, in stores and public spaces, at work and among friends and family, the Allies are making a long-term investment in protecting healthy infant feeding and are positioned as trustworthy for expecting moms, new parents, and the public.

Moms are bombarded daily with information about infant feeding, but not all of it is reliable, and much of it undermines infant feeding decisions and breastfeeding success rates.  All expecting and new moms deserve to know what businesses “have their backs” during the most vulnerable period of motherhood, just as they deserve to know which car seat is safest, which health care providers to trust, and which blogs or websites to turn to for accurate information.

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The C.A.R.E. Code Alliance program, and its accompanying seal, rewards and recognizes businesses, nonprofits and blogs that protect healthy infant feeding by marketing them to families and the media.  Members of the Alliance pledge to uphold a core set of criteria, as well as the Best for Babes Credo, and promise to raise mainstream awareness of the International WHO Code and of the importance of positive messaging for breastfeeding.

C.A.R.E. Code Criteria

C: Cheering and encouraging moms with positive messages.

A: Accepting, accommodating and non- judgmental about parents’ feeding decisions.

R: Referring to or Recommending expert lactation help as appropriate.

E: Evidence-based information is the standard in all communications.

I encourage you to learn more about Best for Babes and to support my fellow Alliance members this holiday season and beyond!  You can join the CARE Code Deals page on Facebook to stay up to date with the latest deals and sales!

2016-2017 C.A.R.E. Code Alliance Members

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COMPANIES:

Ameda

Amorini USA

Ardo

BabyMama

Earth Mama Angel Baby

Fairhaven Health

Indigo Willow

Juno Blu

Leading Lady

Breastfeeding with Comfort and Joy

Limerick

Mamava

Melinda G

Milky Mama

Moby Wrap

Motherlove

My Brest Friend

Nancy Mohrbacher Solutions

North Faun

Nurse Purse

Oat Mama

Rachel’s Remedy

Rumina

Sarah Wells Bags

Silverette USA

SleepBelt

Snugabell

Spectra Baby USA

Tiny Tummies Lactation Services

YBreast

Zutano

MEDIA:

Badass Breastfeeder

Boob Geek

Breastfeeding Mama Talk

Human Milk News

KellyMom

Normalize Breastfeeding

NONPROFITS:

1000 Days

Breastfeed LA

Healthy Children

HMBANA

La Leche League of USA

Mom2Mom Global

National Alliance of Breastfeeding Advocacy

NEC Society

New York Milk Bank

USLCA

Wise Qi

 

Increasing Your Milk Supply

By: Helen Anderson (IBCLC)

Mother doing breast feeding electronic for her baby milk stock

Mother doing breast feeding electronic for her baby milk stock

Worried about your milk supply? You’re not alone, all but a few moms stress about their supply at some point in their breastfeeding journey. It is normal to feel short on milk when your baby is going through a growth spurt or adjusting to a new schedule (think going back to work or teething). If you experience low milk supply, think of it as a bump in the road, not a stop sign and add a few new skills to your pumping and nursing routine. There are many things you can do to boost your milk production, adding a few of these techniques can have a significant positive impact on your milk supply.

First things first – examine your lifestyle and current nursing/pumping routine.

• The most common reason for low milk supply is not nursing or not pumping often enough or long enough to empty the breasts. When breasts stay full or are not emptied completely, your body gets the signal to make less milk.

• Ineffective or short pumping sessions can leave too much milk in the breasts, causing a drop in production.

• Painful pumping can inhibit your let-down. Make sure your pump parts fit your body and don’t turn the suction up too high. Use a nipple balm to sooth and heal sore nipples.

• An olive oil based balm like Milkies Nipple Nurture can be applied before pumping if friction is causing discomfort.

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• Drink water, rest and relax. Dehydration, fatigue, and stress can also have a negative effect on your milk supply.

• If you are taking oral birth control pills, the estrogen in the medication can decrease your milk production. If you see a drop in supply, switch to a non-hormonal, barrier method like condoms. Cold medicines, nicotine and alcohol can also cause your supply to decrease.

To maximize your supply, do these things:

• Ditch the binky and put your baby to breast if fussy

• Breastfeed or pump 8-12 times in every 24 hour period

• Eat nutritious meals and increase your water intake

• Try to reduce your stress, ask family and friends for help. Be specific about how they can help. For example – ask a friend to wash, fold and put away some laundry or pick up items on your grocery list.

• Offer both breasts at each feeding and allow your baby to nurse until he or she shows disinterest. Change positions and holds to empty each breast more completely.

• Use a double electric pump. Talk to your insurance company or WIC clinic to find a pump that works for you – at no cost.

• Spend as much time as possible skin-to-skin with your baby. Strip your baby to only a diaper, place him or her against your bare chest. Men (or non-nursing parents) can do skin-to-skin too – it creates a stronger bond, keeps your baby warm and shares your partner’s good bacteria with your baby.

• Add a breastfeeding supplement to your daily routine, Milkies Nursing Blend combines nutritional support with milk boosting herbs like fenugreek.

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• Empty your breasts often and completely. The best way to do completely empty your breasts is with breast compression and hands-on-pumping. These related techniques can increase your milk production up to 50%.

• If your baby is sleeping more than 4 hours, wake him or pump.

• Schedule a Babymoon! Take a day or two to stay home to pump and nurse. Focus on your baby, nurse on demand and pump after each breastfeeding session. Your body will get the “Make more milk” signal!

  • Use breast compression while breastfeeding. It will keep your baby awake, reduce nipple pain, plugged ducts and more completely empty your breast.

How to use breast compression while nursing:

Use breast compression when your baby is breastfeeding. Latch your baby in a position that allows you to get a free hand; a breastfeeding pillow can be helpful here. Encircle your breast with thumb on one side and remaining fingers on the other and squeeze when your baby is nibbling but not drinking. Stop squeezing and rest your hand when baby swallows. Breast compression helps your baby gets to the fatty hind milk, stay awake at the breast and reduces sore nipples, mastitis and plugged ducts. It’s a simple technique, watch a video here.

 

Use hands-on-pumping to pump more milk and keep your supply strong. Start pumping with a double electric pump and hands-free pumping bra, use both hands to place steady pressure on the milk ducts at the base of the breast, up from your nipple. Full milk ducts feel hard, continue to pump and message for 2 minutes after you cannot feel any more hard spots, and milk has stopped dripping as you pump. Watch a wonderful video of hands-on-pumping here.

Always keep the number of a lactation consultant nearby or call your hospital or WIC office for help if you think your milk supply is decreasing. Find a breastfeeding support group or La Leche League meeting in your area for more social support at breastfeeding.

Chat with Helen live about milk supply & manual breast compression on the Breastfeeding Mama Talk Facebook page on December 13th, at 2 p.m. Pacific Standard Time! Everyone who participates in the chat is automatically entered to win some free products from http://www.fairhavenhealth.com !

Five Year Old Breastfeeding Triplets…

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By: Davina Wright

So, five years! Nursing triplets! Who knew right? Not me, that’s for sure. My older two kids both self-weaned around 13-14 months, so my rather lofty goal with the trio was 2 years. But here we are, still going.

I have often heard ‘oh you’re just doing it for you now, it’s not about the children’, but in all honesty I would be happy if they weaned now. I am big on letting the child decide when they are ready to wean but at the same time I’m like ‘dudes, there are 3 of you, and you’re 5, come on already!’ I am tired, I am touched out, and I am pretty sure the last of the ‘baby weight’ won’t shift until they stop. It’s not that I want my body back to myself, because the three of them will continue to climb on me, sit on me and take ‘piggy back rides’ on me, it’s more that I am just feeling done.

But they love it so much, truly they do. They are at times obsessed with ‘numnees’ and let me know. I say no a lot. Our biggest challenge at the moment is lessons in respecting boundaries and body autonomy. For example, they ask for boobie and I don’t want to, I say ‘no’ and they gang up on me. It’s like dealing with a bunch of walkers (yes I’m a TWD fan) when they just keep coming at me, pulling at my clothes, trying to get my boobs out and just not listening to my ‘no’. It can be quite upsetting to not feel ‘heard’ by your own children in this situation. But they are only children and so it’s a repetitive lesson and I will continue reinforcing that this is my body and my rules – something I hope teaches them how to respect their own bodies as they get older.

When they were newborns and my body was the ONLY thing sustaining them then obviously that rule didn’t apply, but since about 2 years old, boundaries have been slowly added such as when and where and how to long to nurse. Now we are down to only once or twice a day, generally before bed and maybe on waking in the morning, for about 5-10 minutes. And I do still love how it calms them, especially at night as they go to sleep. There have been nights when they go to sleep without it for whatever reason and they are fine, but I do love that quiet one on one connection which may be the only quiet one on one time I get with them each day!

They have been at pre-school for a year now, and for those worried about kids still breastfeeding at that age I can say they don’t ask for it at pre-school (too much other stuff running through their minds I guess), they don’t get bullied about it because they haven’t told the other kids that they breastfeed (too much other stuff running through their minds I guess), and when they start big school next year, if they are still nursing, I expect it to be much the same.

One of the nicest things about breastfeeding older children is that they are able to verbalise their joy of breastfeeding to you. Mine tell me quite often how much they love it and how happy it makes them. When people worry about them remembering nursing at this age (as if that’s a bad thing), I sure hope that it is these moments of love and happiness and connection that they do get to remember!

Follow Davina on her Facebook page over at – Boobs, No Bollocks